Student Doctors Make the Rounds

MICDS students to McDonnell Hall 210, stat!

Freshmen and sophomores in the Bio-Chemicals Applications Accelerated class dove headfirst into medical drama, ending a research process in a group exercise that they say was a lot more fun than taking a test.

Led by Science Teachers Annie Knapp and Kelly Anderson, the class allows students to demonstrate what they’ve learned through a process that goes beyond rote memorization and regurgitating facts onto a piece of paper during an exam. “Ideally, we wanted our students to delve into something complex,” said Knapp. “This is not the first research project they have done, but they do come across very complex vocabulary and medical terminology.”

Students were divided into teams and given genetic diseases to research and study. They then used their research to compile a case study for presentation to classmates. Some students used the Maker Space to create 3D models of physical symptoms.

Each “doctor team” stood before the class (everyone decked out in lab coats, of course) and gave their fictitious patient’s background, symptoms and family history. They provided the results of any medical tests that had been run on their patient and then opened the floor to questions. Classmates served as a panel of “medical students,” working to solve the case and correctly diagnose the patient. They asked questions, requested additional medical testing and debated answers and possible diseases. Having done their own research, they were well-prepared with proper medical terminology and appropriate questions about symptoms. Presentations and discussion took 10 to 15 minutes before the next team of “doctors” took the floor, and students were given more time after to continue narrowing down possible diagnoses.

Raneem Alzahabi ’21 is interested in studying dermatology. She said that the experience only strengthened her excitement to go into medicine. Her teammate, Lucas McCarty ’21, enjoyed the process as well. He plans to study engineering and is interested in robotics, but said that studying human genetic conditions and debating possible diagnoses gave him a better understanding of how his own body works.

St. Elsewhere. E.R. Grey’s Anatomy. House. Chicago Med. While entertaining, those shows have nothing on our talented student doctors, who also made it to television with a story that aired on KMOV April 9. Check it out here!